Genetic effects of straying of non-native hatchery fish into natural populations

proceedings of the workshop June 1-2, 1995, Seattle, Washington
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U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Available through National Technical Information Service , Seattle, Wash, Springfield, Va
Fish populations -- Northwest, Pacific -- Congresses., Fishery resources -- Hatchery vs. wild stocks -- Congresses., Fishery resources -- Hatchery vs. wild stocks -- Northwest, Pacific -- Congresses., Fishes -- Racial analysis -- Congresses., Fishes -- Racial analysis -- Northwest, Pacific -- Congresses., Salmon -- Genetics -- Congre
Other titlesStraying of non-native hatchery fish into natural populations.
Statementedited by W. Stewart Grant.
SeriesNOAA technical memorandum NMFS-NWFSC -- 30.
ContributionsGrant, W. Stewart., Northwest Fisheries Science Center (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 130 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15450937M

PDF | On Jan 1,W. Stewart Grant and others published Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-Native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations | Find, read and cite all the research you need on. Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-Native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations.

Proceedings of the Workshop JuneSeattle, Washington Edited by W. Stewart Grant. National Marine Fisheries Service Northwest Fisheries Science Center Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division Conservation Biology Program.

Even though some straying occurs among wild populations (usually less than 5%; Lindsey et al.VernonRich and Holmes ), the amount of straying between natural and hatchery stocks is of concern because it can reduce the fitness of natural populations (Fleming and GrossMeffeLeider et al.Waples ). The key factor when considering the genetic effects of straying is maladaptive gene flow, not just the physical presence of non-local or hatchery-origin fish in natural populations.

However, direct measures of gene flow are at best difficult to obtain, and the number of strays into a spawning population may be all that we have as surrogate. Wild populations can potentially be affected by one-way straying of non-native hatchery fish in three ways.

The first is the spread of deleterious alleles into a wild population, and as noted in the previous talk, the ability of non-native alleles to invade a wild population depends critically on selection intensities. Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-Native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations.

values of G ST observed for salmonids suggest that the amount of genetically effective migration or "straying" between natural populations is K., N.

Ryman, and F. Utter. Genetic effects of cultured fish on natural fish populations. Can. Inbreeding depression is the reduced biological fitness in Genetic effects of straying of non-native hatchery fish into natural populations book given population as a result of inbreeding, or breeding of related tion biological fitness refers to an organism's ability to survive and perpetuate its genetic material.

Inbreeding depression is often the result of a population general, the higher the genetic variation or gene pool within a breeding. However, the genetic effects of hatchery fish on wild populations have not yet been fully evaluated, and their long-term effects remain largely unknown, with no data available for marine species.

Examining Genetic Effect Hypotheses of Hatchery Fish on Wild Populations: A Bayesian Approach. Shuichi Kitada. Book Editor(s): Genetic Structure and Diversity of Japanese Chum Salmon Populations Inferred from Single‐Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers, Transactions of the American Fisheries Society,5.

A wide variety of outcomes, ranging from no detectable effect to complete introgression or displacement, has been observed following releases of cultured fish into natural settings.

Where genetic effects on performance traits have been documented, they always appear to be negative in comparison with the unaffected native populations. The maximum-likelihood estimate of immigration rate from these hatcheries into the wild Vindelälven population was (95% CI –) over the studied time period (–) and.

• If hatchery fish manage to return and escape the fishery, they often stray into wild spawning grounds. • With lower survival, reproductive capacity, and adaptation to natural systems, genetic mixing of hatchery and wild fish reduces the potential of wild salmon recovery.

-Hilborn and. Felsenstein, J.

Description Genetic effects of straying of non-native hatchery fish into natural populations FB2

Population differentiation and evolutionary processes. In: W.S. Grant (ed.), Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations. U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Technical Memorandum NOAA Fisheries – NWFSC   To the extent that these genetic differences reduce the fitness of hatchery fish in the wild (Reisenbichler and Mclntyre, ; Chilcote et al., ; Leider et al., ), the straying of hatchery-pro- duced salmonids to interbreed with wild fish is cause for.

Grant, W.S. (ed.) () Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations: Proceedings of the Workshop. US Department of Commerce, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NWFSC   Continued influx of hatchery fish together with the return of hybrids may alter the wild gene pool, reduce stock fitness, and thus threaten the survival of the wild population.

An alternative perspective is that hatchery strays will have little genetic impact on wild stocks. The influx of new genetic material through straying is a natural.

Using the genetic tools for parentage, reproductive success to the fry stage can be estimated for hatchery-origin versus natural-origin fish in each stream, as well as provide data for comparisons between low and high stray rates for each of the two species with replication.

Rapid Genetic Changes in Hatchery Fish and the Effect on Reproductive Success Abstract: Hatchery Fish on the Spawning Grounds Reduces Natural Production Relationship Between Natural Productivity and the Frequency of Wild Fish in Mixed Spawning Populations of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (Full Text).pdf.

Get this from a library. Genetic effects of straying of non-native hatchery fish into natural populations: proceedings of the workshop June, Seattle, Washington.

[W Stewart Grant; Northwest Fisheries Science Center (U.S.);]. Debates on the genetic effects of hatchery programmes on wild fish have been dominated by whether correct management practices can reduce negative outcomes, but we noted that there has been an absence of programmatic research approaches addressing this important issue.

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For hatchery releases, the steelhead study in Hood River, Oregon, USA, was the first to find that lifetime RRS of hatchery fish spawned from one hatchery and one wild parent (HW) was 55% of hatchery fish having two wild parents (WW) spawned in a natural environment (Araki, Cooper, et al., ) and the reduction in RS carried over to the next.

broodstock and where the progeny fish are reared, e.g., at a hatchery. Fish that do not return to a hatchery or release site are commonly called “strays”.

Recapture and removal of unharvested, hatchery-origin adults at a hatchery (or other release site) reduces the potential for genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations.

Negative genetic impacts could include interbreeding of nonharvested hatchery fish with wild fish in nature, shifts in the genetic structure of populations through large releases of hatchery fish relative to wild fish production, and declines in effective population size of wild spawning fish by ‘mining’ the natural population for use as.

1) biological principles underlying the genetics of fish, 2) genetic tools and their application to fish populations, and 3) genetic issues in fisheries management.

A glossary of technical terms is provided. The most significant changes in this second edition of Genetic Guidelines are in Chapter Two: Genetic Tools for Fisheries Applications.

Genetic Load Inbreeding Self-Fertilization Hybrid Vigor Genetic Fitness Selection, Genetic Gene Flow Algorithms Water Wells Neural Networks (Computer) Solar Energy. Disciplines and Occupations 1.

Details Genetic effects of straying of non-native hatchery fish into natural populations FB2

Genetics, Population. Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena 4. Relatively few hatchery fish successfully spawn in the wild, but those that stray from their hatchery location and make their way up a wild salmon stream may do more harm than good.

If they mate with wild salmon, they may introduce weaker genetics to the wild gene pool that harm the long-term genetic fitness of the population, impacting its. NOAA Tech Memo NMFS NWFSC Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-Native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations STRAYING OF HATCHERY FISH AND FITNESS OF NATURAL POPULATIONS Bill Bakke Washington Trout and Native Fish Society P.O.

Box Portland, ORUSA Opinion from Jim Myron Conservation Director, Oregon Trout. Genetic interactions between hatchery-origin fish and wild-origin fish fall into two classes: direct effects and indirect effects. Direct effects are those resulting from interbreeding between hatchery fish or non-native fish with wild fish, while indirect genetic effects result from the ecological and behavioral interactions between wild and.

T.P. Quinn [], Homing, Straying and Colonization, NOAA Tech Memo NMFS NWFSC Genetic Effects of Straying of Non-Native Hatchery Fish into Natural Populations.

A new study on steelhead trout in Oregon offers genetic evidence that wild and hatchery fish are different at the DNA level, and that they can become different with surprising speed.

The research. It was based on years of genetic analysis of thousands of steelhead trout in Oregon’s Hood River, in field work dating back to Scientists have been able to genetically “fingerprint” three generations of returning fish to determine who their parents were, and whether or not they were wild or hatchery fish.They also have the potential to disrupt the genetic composition of natural populations, and beneficial genes in locally adapted natural-origin salmonids may become diluted by mating with hatchery-origin individuals.

The greatest risk is if the hatchery fish have been selected for domestication or are from a non-native stock (Keefer et al. ). The Spring Creek Hatchery program, which originated from White Salmon fall Chinook stock, is located immediately downstream of the river mouth and produces fish that stray into the White Salmon River.

SinceSpring Creek Hatchery tules have accounted for more than 30% of the natural spawning fish.