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Meningococcal Disease (Methods in Molecular Medicine)

  • 744 Pages
  • 3.98 MB
  • 1850 Downloads
  • English

Humana Press
Infectious & contagious diseases, Microorganisms, Medical, Neisseria meningitidis, Infectious Diseases, Medical / Nursing, Microbiology, Meningitis, Meningococcal, Laboratory Medicine, Neurology - General, Medical / Infectious Diseases, Molecular aspects, Life Sciences - Biology - Microbiology, diagnosis, Laboratory manuals, Menin
ContributionsAndrew J. Pollard (Editor), Martin C.J. Maiden (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9522928M
ISBN 100896038491
ISBN 139780896038493

Meningococcal disease is an acute, potentially severe illness caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Illness believed to be meningococcal disease was first reported in the 16th century. The first definitive description of the disease was by Vieusseux in Switzerland in Meningococcal meningitis is characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied by nausea, vomiting, photophobia, or altered mental status.

Approximately 40% of people with meningococcal disease present with meningococcal sepsis, known as meningococcemia. Meningococcal Disease book is highly recommended to microbiologists, epidemiologists and clinicians dealing with meningococcal disease." - Folia Microbiologia "The book claims to be "a comprehensive and authoritative review of meningococcal biology", "an interdisciplinary survey of recent advances and knowledge", to give "cutting-edge methods for the diagnosis, epidemiology and treatment of meningococcal disease", Format: Hardcover.

Less common manifestations of meningococcal infection include conjunctivitis, septic arthritis, and chronic meningococcemia. Invasive infections can be complicated by arthritis, myocarditis, pericarditis, and endophthalmitis.

The overall case-fatality rate for meningococcal disease is ~15% and is somewhat higher in late adolescence and in adults. As such, this is the first volume to summarize the implications of the meningococcus genome-sequencing project, emphasizing the novel strategies in vaccine ing a look at the history, the authors go on to treat the epidemiology of meningococcal disease, as well as the genetics, structure and function of virulence : Hardcover.

The invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a severe form of Neisseria meningitidis infection, most commonly manifested as meningitis or septicemia. Initially, non-specific symptoms of infection with fever, often lead to a rapid deterioration of the patient's condition and death within 12 to 24 hours of the onset of the disease.

Description Meningococcal Disease (Methods in Molecular Medicine) FB2

In developing countries, the incidence rate of invasive meningococcal disease is 10 to 25 perinhabitants per year. The highest rate of 10 to perper year is seen in a belt across sub-Saharan Africa, termed the meningitis belt, with recurrent epidemics of group A.

Death occurs in 6% to 10% of cases and complications in to % of cases. [3]. The 13th Edition Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, a.k.a. the “Pink Book,” provides physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, and others with the most comprehensive information on routinely used vaccines and the diseases they prevent.

This module is the 12th in the series and focuses on meningococcal disease and its related vaccines. OBJECTIVES: At the conclusion of the session, the participant will be able to: For meningococcal disease, describe this disease, including the causative agent.

For meningococcal disease, list the groups at highest risk. Meningococcal disease occurs as a result of a systemic bacterial infection by Neisseria meningitidis.

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Meningococci are gram-negative diplococci, divided into antigenically distinct serogroups. Meningococcal disease is caused by bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. It can lead to serious blood infections. When the linings of the brain and spinal cord become infected, it is called meningitis.

The disease strikes quickly and can have serious complications, including death. Anyone can get meningococcal disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease: Infection Biology, Vaccination, Clinical Following a look at the history, the authors go on to treat the epidemiology of meningococcal disease, as well as the genetics, structure and function of virulence factors.

the book is equally appropriate as introductory reading for graduates embarking on. It is highly recommended to microbiologists, epidemiologists and clinicians dealing with meningococcal disease." - Folia Microbiologia "The book claims to be "a comprehensive and authoritative review of meningococcal biology", "an interdisciplinary survey of recent advances and knowledge", to give "cutting-edge methods for the diagnosis, epidemiology and treatment of meningococcal disease".

The overall case-fatality rate for meningococcal disease is 10% to 15% and is somewhat higher in adolescents. Death is more common in those with coma, hypotension, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia and among those who do not have meningitis.

Meningococcal septicemia and meningitis continue to be important causes of devastating illness, death, and long-term disability in both developed and resource-poor countries of the world. Few diseases have attracted as much public attention, or are as feared by parents and family members, as well as the medical staff who have to care for affected patients.

Invasive meningococcal disease is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis and typically manifests as a blood infection, meningitis, or both.

Symptoms may include sudden onset of fever, headache, rash, limb pain, stiff neck, nausea, vomiting, photophobia (eyes being more sensitive to light), and altered mental status (confusion).

Meningococcal infections are caused by Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcus that colonises the nasopharynx. Bacteria invade the bloodstream or spread within the respiratory tract. Bacteria invade the bloodstream or spread within the respiratory tract.

Meningococcal Carriage and Disease (K. Cartwright). Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease in Europe and the USA (D. Jones). Global Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease (M. Achtman). The Clinical Spectrum of Meningococcal Disease (N.

Steven & M. Wood). Treatment of Meningococcal Disease in Childhood (S. Nadel, et al.). Meningococcal disease describes infections caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. It has a high mortality rate if untreated but is vaccine-preventable.

While best known as a cause of meningitis, it can also result in sepsis, which is an even more damaging and dangerous condition. Meningitis and meningococcemia are major causes of illness, death, and disability in both developed and under Specialty: Infectious disease, critical care medicine.

Meningococcal disease is an uncommon but very serious infection that occurs when the meningococcal bacteria ‘invades’ the body from the throat or nose.

It usually appears as meningitis or sepsis. You can find more information on Meningococcal disease, including what symptoms to look out for, on the Meningococcal disease: Information for the.

Complications of meningococcal disease. Meningococcal infections can progress rapidly to serious disease or death in previously healthy people. The overall mortality risk for IMD is high (5–10%), even if the person receives appropriate antibiotic therapy. Around one-third of children and adolescents who survive IMD develop permanent sequelae.

Meningococcal disease may present with a variety of manifestations, ranging from a transient flu-like illness to fulminant disease with rapid clinical deterioration. Once the bacteria enter the blood stream and the host is unable to clear the infection rapidly, invasive disease, characterized classically into four presentations, will develop.

4,10 1. Meningococcal disease is potentially fatal and should always be viewed as a medical emergency. Admission to a hospital or health centre is necessary, although isolation of the patient is not necessary. Appropriate antibiotic treatment must be started as soon as possible, ideally after the lumbar puncture has been carried out if such a puncture.

Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening infection. It is a term used to describe two major illnesses, meningitis and septicaemia (blood poisoning). Men B is the most common strain in the UK but other strains include Men A, Men C, Men W and Men Y.

Meningitis Now offer support for anyone affected. Quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (Menactra and Menveo) protects against 4 serotypes (subgroups), A, C, W, and Y, of meningococcal disease.

It is recommended for all children years of age and for some younger children with certain health conditions like asplenia (including sickle cell disease), or prior to travel to certain.

Infectious agent of meningococcal disease Neisseria meningitidis (or meningococcus) is a gram-negative diplococcus. There are 13 serogroups of N. meningitidis, with 6 serogroups (A, B, C, W, X and Y) accounting for the majority of cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) worldwide.

Serogroup B is currently responsible for most IMD cases.

Details Meningococcal Disease (Methods in Molecular Medicine) EPUB

Comprehensive and authoritative, Meningococcal Disease: Methods and Protocols integrates the basic science and the clinical and epidemiological aspects of this terrible infectious disease to promote the deeper understanding needed to identify novel targets for therapeutic interventions and vaccines.

Meningococcal infection (or meningococcal disease) is caused by a bacteria called meningococcus. There are 13 strains of meningococcus and five of these can be prevented by vaccines (A, B, C, W and Y strains).

Meningococcal infection is uncommon, and not easily spread, but it can cause serious complications, including. The incidence of meningococcal disease has declined since a peak of reported disease in the late s. Even before routine use of a meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) in adolescents was recommended inthe overall annual incidence of meningococcal disease had decreased 64%, from cases perpopulation in to cases.

Neisseria meningitidis, often referred to as meningococcus, is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause meningitis and other forms of meningococcal disease such as meningococcemia, a life-threatening bacterium is referred to as a coccus because it is round, and more specifically, diplococcus because of its tendency to form pairs.

About 10% of adults are carriers of the bacteria in Class: Betaproteobacteria. Meningococcal disease may occur at any age but the highest rate of meningococcal disease occurs in children under 5 years of age.

Meningococcal B disease is most common in children under one year of age. The next highest risk group are young people aged years. In Ireland the risk of infection is highest in winter and early spring.Green Book Chapter 22 v10_0 meningococcal disease across all age groups is currently around 2 per(Ladhani et al., ).

An increase in indigenous cases of an ST11 capsular group W has been seen in the UK sinceand may herald a new hyper- endemic period (Ladhani et al., ). Meningococcal disease occurs in all countries.Australia has 5 common strains of meningococcal disease they are: Men A, Men B, Men C, Men W and Y.

They are all preventable through vaccination. Meningococcal B is the most common strain in Australia however Meningococcal W follows a close second, is more aggressive and has a higher mortality rate than most of the other strains.

It’s believed 30% of the population carries the.